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Medical Robotic Hand? Rubbery Semiconductor Makes It Possible
A medical robotic hand could allow doctors to more accurately diagnose and treat people from halfway around the world, but currently available...

A medical robotic hand could allow doctors to more accurately diagnose and treat people from halfway around the world, but currently available technologies aren’t good enough to match the in-person experience.

Cullen College grad serves as mentor for Army Educational Outreach Program
Vijay Ramesh, a 2020 Cullen College of Engineering graduate in mechanical engineering, recently added another thing to his impressive list of...
Vijay Ramesh, a 2020 Cullen College of Engineering graduate in mechanical engineering, recently served as a mentor for the interns involved in the Army Educational Outreach Program.

Vijay Ramesh, a 2020 Cullen College of Engineering graduate in mechanical engineering, recently added another thing to his impressive list of accomplishments – serving as a mentor for the interns involved in the Army Educational Outreach Program (AEOP).

UH Bringing Fusion Energy to Commercial Reality
Despite growing scientific and commercial interest in fusion as an on-demand energy source – producing emissions-free energy through the fusion of...
Venkat Selvamanickam will lead a $1.5 million project to develop high temperature superconducting magnets made from low-cost raw materials and capable of handling high currents in a magnetic field greater than 20 Tesla.

Despite growing scientific and commercial interest in fusion as an on-demand energy source – producing emissions-free energy through the fusion of hydrogen atoms – significant obstacles remain. A researcher from the University of Houston has joined an effort by the U.S. Department of Energy to jumpstart the technology.

UH Announces Funding for Carbon Management Projects
Projects Focus on Ways to Speed Transition to Low-Carbon Future The Center for Carbon Management in Energy at the University of Houston has awarded $...
 Getty Images.

Projects Focus on Ways to Speed Transition to Low-Carbon Future

The Center for Carbon Management in Energy at the University of Houston has awarded $275,000 in research funding for projects focused on carbon management and the energy transition.

The projects cover a range of projects, from converting carbon to fuel and other useful products to a proposed new wireless monitoring system for carbon capture storage.

Original research for Drawn-on-Skin electronics from Ershad, Yu attracting attention
Since its publication in late July, a research paper about drawn-on-skin electronics from a group overseen by Dr. Cunjiang Yu, the Bill D. Cook...
Faheem Ershad, a doctoral student of Dr. Cunjiang Yu, served as first author for a new paper involving research about drawn-on-skin electronics.

Since its publication in late July, a research paper about drawn-on-skin electronics from a group overseen by Dr. Cunjiang Yu, the Bill D. Cook Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Houston, has been spotlighted by many media outlets.

‘Drawn-on-Skin’ Electronics Offer Breakthrough in Wearable Monitors
A team of researchers led by Dr. Cunjiang Yu, Bill D. Cook Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Houston, has developed...
Cunjiang Yu, Bill D. Cook Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering, led a team reporting a new form of electronics known as “drawn-on-skin electronics,” which allows multifunctional sensors and circuits to be drawn on the skin with an ink pen.

A team of researchers led by Dr. Cunjiang Yu, Bill D. Cook Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Houston, has developed a new form of electronics known as “drawn-on-skin electronics,” allowing multifunctional sensors and circuits to be drawn on the skin with an ink pen.

New Method of Fluid Gating Has Implications for Drug Delivery, Power Generation and Other Uses
The movement of fluids through small capillaries and channels is crucial for processes ranging from blood flow through the brain to power generation...
Hadi Ghasemi, Cullen Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering, led the discovery of a new way to promote fluid flow through tiny channels and capillaries.

The movement of fluids through small capillaries and channels is crucial for processes ranging from blood flow through the brain to power generation and electronic cooling systems, but that movement often stops when the channel is smaller than 10 nanometers.

Endowment established in memory of Dr. Kamel Salama
Gwen Salama, the wife of the late Dr. Kamel Salama – a professor at the University of Houston's Cullen College of Engineering and the director of the...
Dr. Kamel Salama.

Gwen Salama, the wife of the late Dr. Kamel Salama – a professor at the University of Houston's Cullen College of Engineering and the director of the Materials Engineering program – said his charm and social nature were evident from their very first meeting, which was when she was having problems with her beat-up Volkswagen in November 1970.

College honors 17 with yearly Faculty and Student Excellence Awards
Dr. Joseph W. Tedesco, Elizabeth D. Rockwell Dean of the UH Cullen College of Engineering, announced that 17 students and faculty members had been...
Dr. David Shattuck of Electrical and Computer Engineering.

Dr. Joseph W. Tedesco, Elizabeth D. Rockwell Dean of the UH Cullen College of Engineering, announced that 17 students and faculty members had been selected as recipients in the 2019-2020 Faculty and Student Excellence Awards, which recognize teaching and research achievements.

New Material, Modeling Methods Promise Advances in Energy Storage
The explosion of mobile electronic devices, electric vehicles, drones and other technologies have driven demand for new lightweight materials that...
Haleh Ardebili, Bill D. Cook Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering at UH, led work demonstrated that modeling based on the material nanoarchitecture can provide a more accurate understanding of ion diffusion and other properties in composite electrodes.

The explosion of mobile electronic devices, electric vehicles, drones and other technologies have driven demand for new lightweight materials that can provide the power to operate them. Researchers from the University of Houston and Texas A&M University have reported a structural supercapacitor electrode made from reduced graphene oxide and aramid nanofiber that is stronger and more versatile than conventional carbon-based electrodes.

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