News

Review article from Ghasemi magnifies nanoengineering developments
Seeing a need in the current literature, a professor from the University of Houston's Cullen College of Engineering led his colleagues in authoring a review article on developments in the field of nanoengineering.
Dr. Hadi Ghasemi, an associate professor of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Houston's Cullen College of Engineering, is one of the lead authors for a new review article on the developments in the field of nanoengineering.

Seeing a need in the current literature, a professor from the University of Houston's Cullen College of Engineering led his colleagues in authoring a review article on developments in the field of nanoengineering.

Cullen College student honored with Hispanic Heritage Youth Activist Award
Since January of this year, undergraduate Yonatan Mascorro of the Cullen College of Engineering’s Mechanical Engineering program has started a new morning regime – push-ups.
Yonatan Mascorro, an undergraduate studying Mechanical Engineering at the University of Houston's Cullen College of Engineering, is the recipient of the 2020 Mayor's Hispanic Heritage Youth Activist Award.

Since January of this year, undergraduate Yonatan Mascorro of the Cullen College of Engineering’s Mechanical Engineering program has started a new morning regime – push-ups.

Papers from Cullen College of Engineering professors make the grade, analysis finds
Several professors and researchers at the University of Houston are among the most cited in the world, according to an October 2020 update by researchers from Stanford about paper citations.

Several professors and researchers at the University of Houston are among the most cited in the world, according to an October 2020 update by researchers from Stanford about paper citations.

Implantable Device Can Monitor and Treat Heart Disease
Researchers Report Rubbery Bioelectronic Cardiac Patch Pacemakers and other implantable cardiac devices used to monitor and treat arrhythmias and other heart problems have generally had one of two drawbacks – they are made with...
Cunjiang Yu, Bill D. Cook Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering at UH, led a group of researchers that developed a cardiac patch made from fully rubbery electronics that can be placed directly on the heart to collect electrophysiological activity, temperature, heartbeat and other indicators, all at the same time.

Researchers Report Rubbery Bioelectronic Cardiac Patch

Pacemakers and other implantable cardiac devices used to monitor and treat arrhythmias and other heart problems have generally had one of two drawbacks – they are made with rigid materials that can’t move to accommodate a beating heart, or they are made from soft materials that can collect only a limited amount of information.

Mechanical Engineering earns #6 spot for value in College Factual 2021 ranking
The Mechanical Engineering program at the University of Houston’s Cullen College of Engineering ranked No. 6 in College Factual’s most recent rankings for the best value schools for majors. According to statistics provided by...
College Factual has named the Mechanical Engineering program at the University of Houston’s Cullen College of Engineering as the sixth-best value school for the major.

The Mechanical Engineering program at the University of Houston’s Cullen College of Engineering ranked No. 6 in College Factual’s most recent rankings for the best value schools for majors.

According to statistics provided by College Factual, this puts the program in the top 5 percent of the country for Mechanical Engineering students seeking a bachelor’s degree. The school improved its ranking by nine slots from last year’s ranking of No. 15.

How Do Snakes ‘See’ in the Dark? Researchers Have an Answer
Certain species of snake – think pit vipers, boa constrictors and pythons, among others – are able to find and capture prey with uncanny accuracy, even in total darkness. Now scientists have discovered how these creatures are...
Research led by Pradeep Sharma, chairman of the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Houston, offers an explanation for how some species of snake convert the heat from organisms that are warmer than their ambient surroundings into electrical signals, allowing them to “see” in the dark.

Certain species of snake – think pit vipers, boa constrictors and pythons, among others – are able to find and capture prey with uncanny accuracy, even in total darkness. Now scientists have discovered how these creatures are able to convert the heat from organisms that are warmer than their ambient surroundings into electrical signals, allowing them to “see” in the dark.

Medical Robotic Hand? Rubbery Semiconductor Makes It Possible
A medical robotic hand could allow doctors to more accurately diagnose and treat people from halfway around the world, but currently available technologies aren’t good enough to match the in-person experience.

A medical robotic hand could allow doctors to more accurately diagnose and treat people from halfway around the world, but currently available technologies aren’t good enough to match the in-person experience.

Cullen College grad serves as mentor for Army Educational Outreach Program
Vijay Ramesh, a 2020 Cullen College of Engineering graduate in mechanical engineering, recently added another thing to his impressive list of accomplishments – serving as a mentor for the interns involved in the Army Educational...
Vijay Ramesh, a 2020 Cullen College of Engineering graduate in mechanical engineering, recently served as a mentor for the interns involved in the Army Educational Outreach Program.

Vijay Ramesh, a 2020 Cullen College of Engineering graduate in mechanical engineering, recently added another thing to his impressive list of accomplishments – serving as a mentor for the interns involved in the Army Educational Outreach Program (AEOP).

UH Bringing Fusion Energy to Commercial Reality
Despite growing scientific and commercial interest in fusion as an on-demand energy source – producing emissions-free energy through the fusion of hydrogen atoms – significant obstacles remain. A researcher from the University of...
Venkat Selvamanickam will lead a $1.5 million project to develop high temperature superconducting magnets made from low-cost raw materials and capable of handling high currents in a magnetic field greater than 20 Tesla.

Despite growing scientific and commercial interest in fusion as an on-demand energy source – producing emissions-free energy through the fusion of hydrogen atoms – significant obstacles remain. A researcher from the University of Houston has joined an effort by the U.S. Department of Energy to jumpstart the technology.

UH Announces Funding for Carbon Management Projects
Projects Focus on Ways to Speed Transition to Low-Carbon Future The Center for Carbon Management in Energy at the University of Houston has awarded $275,000 in research funding for projects focused on carbon management and the...
 Getty Images.

Projects Focus on Ways to Speed Transition to Low-Carbon Future

The Center for Carbon Management in Energy at the University of Houston has awarded $275,000 in research funding for projects focused on carbon management and the energy transition.

The projects cover a range of projects, from converting carbon to fuel and other useful products to a proposed new wireless monitoring system for carbon capture storage.

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